John Morrison

John Morrison – Understanding Modern Coaching

A Coach is not someone who tells players what to do

A Coach is not someone who tells players what to do

Coaching within the GAA has changed dramatically in the past two decades.

With the demand for greater success, the association understood that the coach had to get better.

Advertisement

In his current Gaelic Life Column, John Morrison explains that the change began around the millennium.

Here’s what he says makes a post 2000s coach.

(i) They don’t talk, they listen;

(ii) they don’t give information, they ask questions;

(iii) they don’t offer ideas, they generate ideas from players who often can ask better questions and have better ideas than the coach;

(iv) they don’t share their experience, they tap into the players thinking (to help them create solutions);

(vi) don’t give suggestions, they empower players to choose;

(vii) don’t fix problems, they build strengths by which to win games.

 

Read the full column in the current issue of Gaelic Life. If you’d like to read it now, buy the online edition by clicking here

Carlow's result proved to Steven Poacher that an open system is important for the GAA.

How do you get players to put their full effort into training?

Steven Poacher says coaches must encourage the freedom of expression.